Oi! Energizer batteries are coming back to Australian homes

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Energizer, a household name in Australia after generations of classic commercials, is entering the Australian residential energy storage (RES) market with a typical bang, or is it a Mark “Jacko” Jackson style yell? “Oi!” 

And it’s a big “Oi”. Melbourne-based 8 Star Energy, Energizer’s sole global licensee for Energizer and Everready branded products, including RES, has selected Australian renewable energy systems and software provider Evergen as its optimisation partner. Every Energizer home battery system will be combined with Evergen’s intelligent software.

Evergen’s technology, developed by the CSIRO, tracks the consumption patterns of a single solar and energy storage system in tandem with weather forecasts to best tailor when the system should utilise its solar generation, when to store it, when to utilise the battery or the grid, effectively ensuring your system is working in the most cost-effective fashion.

Energizer will offer two RES systems, a 5.7kWh and an 11.4kWh, both of which can form part of a virtual power plant (VPP), a microgrid, or take part in other storage assets made available when solar and battery systems combined with optimisation tools. 

“The Energizer brand has a strong presence worldwide,” said Evergen CEO Ben Hutt, “and this partnership is aligned with the Evergen global strategy to have our Australian software distributed alongside a household name.” 

“As international energy markets evolve,” continued Hutt, “battery storage technologies and the software that enables and controls them will become integral in the energy landscape of the future.” 

Energizer is certainly a household name in Australia, but unlike North America, Australia was never properly introduced to the Energizer Bunny. Instead, and in typically amateur 80s Aussie style, Energizer went with the “ocker-overdose” option of former Australian footballer Mark “Jacko” Jackson. Jacko’s Energizer commercials typified the highly successful Aussie advertising technique of yelling. 

One wonders how Energizer will advertise its new generation of RES systems to the new generations of Australian consumers. The “ocker-overdose” is not as en vogue as it was back in the larrikin’s heyday of the 1980s. Still, it is hard to imagine Aussie households not enjoying the sight of Barry Hall punching holes in their electricity bills. If only because holes in electricity bills is exactly what solar + energy storage with optimised Evergen software will provide. Hutt claims that such a system, combined with Evergen’s technology, delivers immediate savings of up to 80 percent (on average) to electricity costs. 

“Our partnership with Evergen demonstrates the scope of our collective innovative technologies and services we provide to customers that deliver cost savings and efficient management of their energy consumption,” said Clark McKeon, CEO of 8 Star Energy. “As the word’s energy requirements increase and the switch to renewables is fast becoming the norm, people are demanding clean energy that suits their individual needs.” 

The Aussie partnership will see Energizer batteries on offer in 56 countries worldwide, a coup for the Australian renewables industry, and especially for a technology developed by the CSIRO. 

In a capital raise last year Evergen crowdfunded $7 million toward its ambitions of expanding globally. Evergen’s first targets were New Zealand and South Africa, but Hutt mentioned at the time that there were some “exciting deals” in the works. He wasn’t lying.