Storage provider Senec acquired by German utility, shipments to Australia begin

Announcing the acquisition, Senec Managing Director Maximilian von Grundherr said that the move will allow the company to continue to roll out new business models for battery storage.

“The strategies and cultures of our companies are a perfect match,” said von Grundherr, in a statement. “At the heart of our solution is an integrated system of energy management and battery storage developed by the company. With our partner EnBW at our side, Senec will continue to grow and open up additional business models in the home storage market.”

The acquisition comes only weeks before Senec’s first shipment of residential batteries arrive in Australia. The first Senec Australia batteries will arrive in Fremantle, WA, on March 31. The company says that the new units, modified slightly from the ones sold in Germany, have recently passed relevant Australian standards. They will be available with a capacity ranging from 2.5 kWh to 10 kWh.

“With a major German utility in the background, Senec is set to become one of the major powers in the battery world,” Senec Australia Managing Director Ian Parkinson told pv magazine Australia. “While our first markets are Germany, Australia and Italy there are a lot of bigger things to come.”

EnBW reports that in recent years it has been expanding its offerings in the area of distributed generation. It already offers storage solutions to clients, but now will have an in-house product. It claims that it currently operates the largest network of e-mobility fast-charging stations in Germany.

“With the Senec solutions, we are becoming a comprehensive supplier of the decentralized energy transition and with this strategic step we are expanding our own value-added chain as well as our competence in the field of intelligent energy management systems,” said Timo Sillober, VP sales, product management and digital at EnBW.

Senec will continue to trade under its own brand. The acquisition is pursuant on approval by German antitrust authorities.